Rope (1948)

Alfred Hitchcock Rope
Rope is far from Hitchcock’s best but it is worth watching, it harks back to a time of nascent special effects when a director’s skill rather than a computer program caused the magic of the movies to come alive.
View Post
Share
View Post

All About My Mother (1999)

Impressively crafted, handsomely acted (especially by Roth) and emotionally satisfying, Almodóvar’s All About My Mother assumes a zenith in the auteur’s fascinating oeuvre. Above all, this is a heartfelt paean to motherhood and human resilience.
View Post
Share
View Post

Wings of Desire (1987)

Here is a film that wraps you up and never lets you go. Wings of Desire transcends conventional film form into a haunting, lyrical, elegiac, beautifully profound cinematic poetry about earthbound existence. For a film about angels, Wim Wenders provides a very humanist philosophy here, a deeply touching love-letter to the simple pleasures of human life. An enriching, stunning work of art.
View Post
Share
View Post

Funny Girl (1968)

This is Streisand’s central, magnificent show through and through, eclipsing anything and anyone in Funny Girl. It’s a musical/comic masterstroke, elevating an otherwise formulaic film about a star’s rise-and-shine, William Wyler’s first and only musical in his entire formidable filmography.
View Post
Share
View Post

Manon des Sources (1986)

Some nitpicky contrivances aside, Manon des Sources stands up right alongside its film brother Jean de Florette. Berri concludes this Provençal melodrama in sumptuous fashion, with a beautiful, aggrieved shepherdess seeking retribution and an avaricious landowner facing his own tragic, self-made comeuppance.
View Post
Share
View Post

Jean de Florette (1986)

Whether you agree with the damning attack of French critics or nod along with the millions of who praised and loved this French soap-opera, there’s no denying that Jean de Florette is an exquisitely photographed, lovingly portrayed elemental tale of land, water and the people that fought to possess them.
View Post
Share
View Post

It’s A Wonderful Life (1946)

A genuinely redemptive film that goes beyond its pigeonholed “Christmas classic” status. Frank Capra conjures a magic trick here, a decidedly dark message-movie with a feel-good factor that is rarely delivered even from the most populist of directors today. And James Stewart has rarely been better. It will make you laugh, be fascinated and then sob into your glass of Cabernet Sauvignon.
View Post
Share
View Post

Citizen Kane (1941)

A glorious, towering achievement in 20th century cinema. Even now, this remains the most revolutionary piece of celluloid since the dawn of the sound era, or perhaps since the invention of cinema itself. Thrillingly innovative, giddily entertaining and impeccably framed, shot, acted and directed. Orson Welles, for all his narcissism, will have you moved and converted.
View Post
Share