Carol (2015)

There’s rarely anything out there that feels as deeply as Carol. Todd Haynes’ achingly sublime, artful evocation of love is a rarefied, nearly-extinct breed of cinema that breathes life into the classically…
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Last Tango in Paris (1972)

Like most challenging works of art, it divides people. But to claim Last Tango in Paris as a pile of puerile sexual nonsense is an act of antagonism against intellectualism. It is one of most emotionally and sexually frank films ever made, boldly confronting society’s preconceived notions about sex, relationships, conventions and censorship. Bertolucci orchestrates a sad, devastating masterpiece, drawing the last great performance from Brando, arguably the greatest film actor to grace the entire history of celluloid.
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Les Quatre Cent Coups (1959)

For the record, this is one of the greatest childhood films ever captured in celluloid. The film that launched the French New Wave, this one is timeless, truthful, seminal, passionate, heartbreaking and extraordinarily beautiful. That wonderful, aching feeling after watching this is cinema’s pure triumph.
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Funny Girl (1968)

This is Streisand’s central, magnificent show through and through, eclipsing anything and anyone in Funny Girl. It’s a musical/comic masterstroke, elevating an otherwise formulaic film about a star’s rise-and-shine, William Wyler’s first and only musical in his entire formidable filmography.
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Manon des Sources (1986)

Some nitpicky contrivances aside, Manon des Sources stands up right alongside its film brother Jean de Florette. Berri concludes this Provençal melodrama in sumptuous fashion, with a beautiful, aggrieved shepherdess seeking retribution and an avaricious landowner facing his own tragic, self-made comeuppance.
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Jean de Florette (1986)

Whether you agree with the damning attack of French critics or nod along with the millions of who praised and loved this French soap-opera, there’s no denying that Jean de Florette is an exquisitely photographed, lovingly portrayed elemental tale of land, water and the people that fought to possess them.
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Citizen Kane (1941)

A glorious, towering achievement in 20th century cinema. Even now, this remains the most revolutionary piece of celluloid since the dawn of the sound era, or perhaps since the invention of cinema itself. Thrillingly innovative, giddily entertaining and impeccably framed, shot, acted and directed. Orson Welles, for all his narcissism, will have you moved and converted.
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