Possession (1981)

Divorce ain’t easy. Same in real life as it is in movies, the conscious uncoupling of the human species are most likely prone to jealousy, selfishness and bitter break-ups rather…
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White God (2015)

Just when you thought that dogs are the most infinitely lovable and devoted creatures you think they are, Hungarian filmmaker Kornél Mundruczó punches through a poetic yet blistering slice of…
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Tom at the Farm (2014)

The label ‘wunderkind’ seems to be thrown around quite lightly these days, but it doesn’t quite achieve its full meaning unless it’s appropriated to a certain 24-year old Québécois filmmaker.…
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The Imposter (2012)

One of the finest films of the year turns out to be a documentary. The Imposter is a bold, compelling tour-de-force that employs cinematic techniques to explore the nature of truth, deception and storytelling itself. Above all, it defies documentary conventions to expose a darker side of the human mind as good as any work of fiction does.
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Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)

This is one for the brains. Alfredson’s vision is an incredibly restrained, intelligently crafted period piece that puts the spy genre back into human realism, questioning values like friendship, loyalty and trust like pawns being moved around in a bigger chess game. And it has Oldman, whose central performance is one for the ages.
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Hanna (2011)

Whilst sporadically absurd and often restrained, Hanna works well as a postmodern take on Brothers Grimm crossed with post-Cold War spy thriller. It’s smartly paced, impressively choreographed and directed by Wright, and anchored by a solid central performance by Ronan, who’s running ahead as best young actress of her time. Plus, it has Blanchett playing mega-bitch, too.
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127 Hours (2010)

Danny Boyle certainly knows how to hold your attention in this exhilaratingly told motivational drama. Not a single minute of 127 Hours drips with abandon nor steers into cheapo sentimentality. This is dignified, glorious and triumphant, with a winning James Franco as the American self-made hero, Aron Ralston.
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Black Swan (2010)

A marvellously dark, protean piece of postmodern cinema. Black Swan is a high-wire, class act both by Aronofsky’s technical ingenuity and Portman’s bracingly, breathlessly passionate performance. Hers is an acting accomplishment that would soon become a yardstick for any future Hollywood actresses (or actors) to come.
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